Skillsfirst Level 5 Diploma in Financial Trading (RQF) - Module 4 - Technical Analysis
Skillsfirst Level 5 Diploma in Financial Trading (RQF) - Module 5 - Psychology
Skillsfirst Level 5 Diploma in Financial Trading (RQF) - Module 6 - Risk and Money Management
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CONSTRUCTING P&F CHARTS

Conventional technical-analysis charts tend to be the open-close/high-low chart. In the creation of P&F, the emphasis is only on the closing price of an issue. The developers of P&F charting were interested in trend development and thus were concerned not with the “noise” created daily by minor moves up or down, but with the larger picture and how that plays out in the areas of supply and demand.

The key to P&F charts is the establishment of the ‘unit of price’, which is the unit measurement of a price movement that is plotted on the graph. On PV charts, there is no time axis, only a price axis. Rising stock prices are shown with X’s and falling prices are shown with O’s. These points appear on the chart only if the price moved at least one unit of price in either direction.

So, say the closing prices of a stock moved up one price unit three times. This would appear as a column of three X’s. If the price movement reverses direction, the chart shows a new column of O’s, wherein an O is plotted for each unit of price movement. X’s and O’s never appear in the same column. The chartist, however, must establish how many price units make up a box, which is how much the price must move in the opposite direction for the chart to begin a new column.

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